A New Study Reveals People Are Less Likely to Catch Influenza If They Are Already Infected with The Other Virus

A New Study Reveals People Are Less Likely to Catch Influenza If They Are Already Infected with The Other Virus

People had been less more likely to catch both influenza or a standard cold-causing rhinovirus if they had been already infected with the other virus, a new study by scientists from the Medical Research Council-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research has discovered.

Understanding how these distinct viruses inhibit one another might help public health planning to enhance forecasting models that predict respiratory disease outbreaks and methods for controlling disease spread, say the scientists.

It has been noticed before that common cold infections look like much less frequent within the influenza season and vice versa. The new research, revealed within the journal Proceedings of the Nationwide Academy of Sciences, is the first study with sufficient samples to offer strong proof for this interaction at both the population and individual level.

Samples from 44,230 instances of acute respiratory illness, in 36,157 patients, had been tested for 11 types of respiratory viruses over nine years in NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde and Using this information, the researchers discovered that 35% tested positive for a virus, and, of those, 8% had been co-infected with multiple types of virus.

Probably the most striking interaction they discovered was between influenza A viruses and rhinoviruses, a type of virus that may cause the common cold. Computer modeling of the information discovered that the inhibitory interactions between influenza and rhinoviruses appeared to happen within individual people in addition to at a population level.

The research looked at how 11 viruses interacted. It did discover relationships between among the different virus pairs; however, these weren’t consistent at each individual host and population level, which the research did find for influenza A and rhinovirus.