The Researchers Have Developed a Soft Polymer Material That Uses Magnetic Fields to Transform into Various Shapes

The Researchers Have Developed a Soft Polymer Material That Uses Magnetic Fields to Transform into Various Shapes

The researchers from Ohio State University and the Georgia Institute of Technology and has developed a soft polymer material, known as magnetic form memory polymer, that makes use of magnetic fields to rework into a variety of shapes. The material might allow a range of new applications from antennas that change frequencies on the fly to gripper arms for delicate or heavy objects.

The material is a mix of three totally different elements, all with unique traits: two forms of magnetic particles, one for inductive heat and one with strong magnetic attraction, and shape-memory polymers to assist lock varied form adjustments into place.

The research, which was reported on Dec. 9 within the journal Advanced Materials, was sponsored by the National Foundation of Science, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and the Department of Energy.

To make the material, the researchers started by distributing particles of neodymium iron boron (NdFeB) and iron oxide into a mix of form memory polymers. As soon as the particles had been absolutely integrated, the researchers then molded that mixture into varied objects designed to judge how the material carried out in a sequence of functions.

The shape-changing process takes just a few seconds from beginning to end, and the energy of the material at its locked state allowed the gripper to lift objects as much as 1,000 occasions its own weight.

The researchers additionally examined different functions, the place coil-shaped objects produced from the new materials expanded and retracted—simulating how an antenna might probably change frequencies when actuated by the magnetic fields.